Monday, August 26, 2013

Who's attention is peeked by this blog title?

I see these little goofs most often in the newspaper, so I'm not sure if it's the reporter or the editor who needs a crash course in:

...the difference between peek, peak, and pique

...the difference between who's and whose

Am I nit-picking? Yes, I am. It's that kind of day.

14 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Go ahead and nit pick! Those are sloppy mistakes.

Julie Luek said...

They are sloppy and as soon as I start to roll my eyes, I'm sure to make a worse mistake! (Murphy's Law!)

Patricia Stoltey said...

I'm sure I'll soon find new ones to complain about, Alex. Stay tuned.

Oh, so true, Julie. I miss things from time to time when proofreading my blog, but I have a wonderful friend in Indiana who's a faithful reader and e-mails me when I goof up so I can fix it. So far, I haven't had a problem with peek, peak, or pique. :D

Deborah Nielsen said...

And "they're" for "their" just drives me absolutely bonkers.

Shannon Baker said...

The back cover copy guy at my press called the drought in Arizona ravishing instead of ravaging. No one caught it. Not until I gave the book to a friend of mine and he nearly split a gut laughing.

Margot Kinberg said...

Pat - It's interesting how those things creep into newspapers and other public writing. I have to admit to being a purist about that kind of thing (not that I've never made that sort of mistake, but still!).

Patricia Stoltey said...

Deborah, I've seen that one too. I think I'll start collecting these goofs from our local paper for a longer post. And then maybe I'll be very mean and put the link on the paper's Facebook page. Maybe. If I'm feeling mean enough.

Shannon, that one really is unbelievable. Ravishing and ravaging are close in pronunciation, I guess, in the same way mottle and model are. I believe a lot of folks have grown up slightly mispronouncing a word and then misusing it as a result.

Prashant C. Trikannad said...

These are not mistakes. I think the reporter or editor actually don't know the difference between these words. Its or It's is another common error. That said, English is a funny language.

Patricia Stoltey said...

Margot, it's worse than just creeping in, it's happening every day.

You may be right, Prashant, and that's even more alarming. English is definitely a funny language, but the people who grew up here, went to school here, and especially those who plan to report, write, and edit, should know their spelling, vocabulary, and grammar. I feel this overwhelming urge to nag...

Yolanda Renee said...

Oh dear, I know I just used peak, somewhere, now if I can just remember where - so I can check and see if it's the right one.

I can't point fingers, I make so many of these mistakes I'm just happy the grammar police don't carry guns or handcuffs, cause I'd never get any writing done. Sort of like the fashion police - I'm a goner there too!

Although, I'm beginning to think newspapers print mistakes on purpose just to get on Leno! But what frightens me are the shortened texting words now used as language.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Patricia .. I'd be totally irritated and I was by your title!

Good one .. things get typed up and sent and then I realise oh oh mistake in there .. too late at that point to correct, but it does annoy me when I know better ..

Cheers Hilary

Patricia Stoltey said...

Yolanda, texting is very hard for me because I resist mutilation of the language. Takes me forever to type a message. I hate to think I'm becoming a member of the grammar police. I'd rather just be known as old and cranky. :D

Hi Hilary -- What I fear most is sending something out to an agent or editor with that kind of error.

Sharon Himsl said...

You got my attention. And they are embarassing mistakes too when we make them ourselves.

Susan Vittitow Mark said...

The one I hate most that's in common usage is "loose" instead of "lose."

Personal favorites from newspapers:
"so hot I thought I sunburned my palette"
a fight where "epitaphs" were thrown
A protester referring to Planned Parenthood's "grizzly trade" (I spent the rest of the day saying "Every bear a wanted bear.")

Favorite bad headline ever: "Domestic violence supporters rally" One of those where you know what they meant, but it's not what they said.

As a former newspaper reporter and editor, I tend to save these for my own amusement. I've certainly had my own. People have to work fast on newspapers. Most people would not catch all the errors going at that pace.